IP Seminar: Patent Basics and Current Issues

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June 18, 2008
Briggs and Morgan, Minneapolis | 1.5 CLE Credits

What is patentable and how can you obtain a patent? How do you protect your own technology? How can you avoid infringing upon the patents of others? Questions like these take on increasing importance in an evolving global and competitive world. Over the past 18 months, significant changes to patent law have taken effect, and more are promised in the near future. How are patent owners, and the patent practice, impacted?

Join Briggs and Morgan's IP group for an informative discussion on the new realities in patent prosecution and litigation, including:

  • Obviousness: A concept recently broadened by the U.S. Supreme Court inKSR Int’l Co. v. Teleflex Inc., new questions exist about what will be patentable in the future, and whether existing patents are now invalid.
  • Inequitable conduct doctrine: Once a plague on the courts, this doctrine was revived in McKesson Information Solutions, Inc. v. Bridge Medical, Inc.Examiner's decisions in one case may need to be disclosed in another.
  • Willful infringement: A new objective standard is applied In re Seagate Technology.
  • Validity of a licensed patent: In Medimmune, Inc. v. Genentech, Inc., the Supreme Court changed longstanding law, holding that a licensee may challenge the validity of a licensed patent by a declaratory judgment action without first breaching the license.

Briggs' seminar is from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., with a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. For more information, or to register (by June 11), e-mail Christine Jones.

About the Speakers

John B. Lunseth II is head of Briggs and Morgan's IP Group, and has been a litigator for more than 30 years. His patent trial successes include Neupak, Inc. v. Ideal Sales & Mfr., Inc., where he defended a patentee against inequitable conduct claims, and Advanced Respiratory, Inc. v. Electromed, Inc. for which he obtained a jury verdict of no infringement on behalf of a medical device manufacturer.

Gerald E. Helget has been a licensed patent attorney for 25 years, focusing his practice in the areas of patent and trademark counseling, prosecution, licensing, and litigation.

Michael M. Lafeber has been an experienced litigation attorney for 12 years, focusing his practice in trademark, patent and copyright litigation.

Nelson R. Capes has been a licensed patent attorney for 15 years, focusing his practice in the areas of patent counseling and prosecution.

Daniel A. Rosenberg has been a licensed patent attorney for 10 years, focusing his practice in the areas of patent and trademark counseling, prosecution, licensing, and litigation.